Chopin and Chevre

9 Feb

Scene: Fancy classical piano concert reception.

Close your eyes. Take a bite. Creamy marinated chevre swimming in a pool of sweet balsamic/roasted garlic olive oil, topped with strips of sundried tomato and aromatic basil. Scooped onto thin slices of fresh baguette with a crackly crust.

After a few thoughtful chews, a revelation: we should be snacking on this more often. With a glass of wine after work on the deck.

Also, hunks of aged cheddar sitting on a slice of pear or green apple, drizzled with honey and fresh thyme.
Or our current favourites: Saint-André triple creme and Le Rustique camembert.

______________________________________
This is from our beloved GR’s Patent and the Pantry.

Goat Cheese with Herbed Olive Oil
Adapted from Gourmet Magazine, January 1994

1 small bay leaf
4 garlic cloves, cut into thin slivers
1 tbsp. (15 mL) fresh rosemary leaves
¼ tsp. (1 mL) coriander seeds, crushed lightly
¼ tsp. (1 mL) fennel seeds, crushed lightly
10 whole black peppercorns
¼ cup (50 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
½ pound (250g) log of soft mild goat cheese
Sliced bread as an accompaniment

In a small saucepan simmer bay leaf, garlic, rosemary, coriander seeds, fennel seeds and peppercorns in oil for 5 minutes. Arrange goat cheese on a platter and spoon oil mixture over. Serve goat cheese with bread.

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Pastis marinated Chevre
1 log (10 oz.) fresh chèvre (goat) cheese
5 teaspoons herbes de provence
2 tablespoons pastis
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Cut 1 log (10 oz.) fresh chèvre (goat) cheese crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices.
Fit slices into a 2-cup jar with an airtight lid. Add 5 teaspoons herbes de provence (or 1 teaspoon each fennel seed and dried basil, rosemary, sage, and thyme), 2 tablespoons pastis, and 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil. Close jar tightly and tilt to mix herbs and oil. Chill at least 24 hours or up to 1 month (oil thickens when chilled but liquefies at room temperature).

Bring to room temperature to serve. Spread cheese and a little oil onto toasted bread or crackers. Save leftover oil for salad dressings.

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