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Monster Cookie

7 Jun

UPDATE: Your baking prayers have been answered. Giant Oreo and Nutty Chocolate Chipper recipes here.

We can’t take credit for this, but we’re one step closer to finding the lost Seventeen magazine recipes so many are searching for: giant chocolate sandwich cookie and Nutty Chocolate Chipper from the August 1977 issue.
Yay for Cliqueypizza and this post.

If anyone has these recipes, please forward them.

We do have a few other random Seventeen cookie recipes of yore to share here. Do you have a Seventeen Now You’re Cooking recipe page to share or request? Join us over here.

CHOCOLATE SHORTBREAD LOGS

2 cups flour
1/2 butter
1/2 cup powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 pkg. chocolate chips
1 tablespoon shortening
1/2 cup walnuts finely chopped
Combine first four ingredients and shape into 2-inch logs. Bake at 350 degrees for 13 minutes.

When ready to ice, melt chocolate and shortening over hot water. Dip ends of each cookie in chocolate and place on waxed paper. Sprinkle with nuts and chill. Makes 6 dozen.

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Thanks to Cayenne for emailing this recipe! She says they are circa 1980-1981.

PEANUT BUTTER TEMPTATIONS
Seventeen Magazine
1/2 cup unsalted butter/margarine
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1-1/4 cups flour
3/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 package or 10oz Reese mini peanut butter cups, foil removed

Preheat oven to 375F
Cream together butter, peanut butter and both sugars together
Beat in egg & vanilla
Sift together flour, baking soda and salt; blend into creamed mixture to make a dough
Shape dough into 1″ balls & place in ungreased 1-1/2″ muffin tin lined with small paper baking cups (I use medium size)
Bake at 375F for 8-10 minutes or until lightly browned
Immediately after removing from oven, press a mini peanut butter cup into the centre of each cookie
Let sit for 10 minutes in muffin tin to melt chocolate, then remove from tin to cooling rack
Store in airtight container
Makes approximately 35-40 cookies

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JELL-O SUGAR COOKIES FOR VALENTINES DAY
Seventeen Magazine

3/4 cup shortening
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 small box red Jell-O
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup granulated sugar

In large bowl, cream shortening and 1/2 cup sugar together with electric mixer. Add eggs, vanilla extract and Jell-O; mix well. Stir in flour, baking powder and salt.
Shape dough into 1-inch balls. Place on greased cooking sheet and flatten with bottom of glass dipped in (1 cup) sugar. Bake at 400 degrees F for 8 to 10 minutes.

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GINGERSNAPS
Early 1980s Seventeen magazine.

3/4 cup shortening
1 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup molasses
1 egg
2 1/4 cups sifted flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

Cream first 4 ingredients together until fluffy. Sift
dry ingredients together; stir into molasses mixture.
Chill dough for an hour. Preheat oven to 375 F. Shape
dough into 1-inch balls. Roll balls in graunluated sugar,
then place 2 inches apart on a greased cookie sheet
(we use parchment instead). Bake for 9 minutes.
Cool slightly on cokie sheet, then remove to
wire racks and let cool completely.
Yield: 4 dozen cookies.
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KONA COAST COOKIES
Seventeen Magazine
1 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup sugar
2 tbsp. water
1 tsp. vanilla
1/2 tsp. almond extract
1 1/2 cup flour
2 1/3 cup (7 oz bag) shredded coconut
maraschino cherries, or macerated dried cherries
Cream butter and sugar. Blend in water and flavorings. Add flour and coconut; mix well.

Thoroughly chill dough; shape into 1-inch balls. Place on baking sheets and press cherry or nut into center of each ball.

Bake at 350°F, 15-20 minutes.

Makes about 4 1/2 dozen cookies.

FRIED BOWKNOT COOKIES (January 1976)

1 cup flour
2 tablespoon flour
3 tablespoon Sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon Salt
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 tablespoon milk
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 egg
powdered sugar
vegetable oil

In a medium bowl, mix flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Cut butter into bits and add to bowl. Add milk, vanilla and egg; mix well; form into a ball. Let rest in a bowl for 15 minutes. Pour oil into a deep medium-size saucepan to a depth of 2 inches; place over moderate heat until oil registers 350degrees F. on a deep-fat thermometer. While oil is heating place dough on a well-floured board. Roll out to a 12 x 8 x 1/8 inch rectangle. Cut into 24 strips, each 8 inches long and 1/2 inch wide. Tie each strip into a loose knot. Carefully place knots about 4 at a time, into preheated oil; cook, turning oftern until knots are crisp and gloden brown, about 2 minutes. Remove from oil with slotted spoon; drain on paper towels repeat until all knots are fried sprinkle with powdered sugar.

SUGAR COOKIES
Reader called them “Seventeen’s” because the recipe came from an issue of Seventeen magazine in the 1940s. The recipe makes several dozen cookies.
1 1/2 cups shortening*
2 1/4 cups sugar
3 eggs, well beaten

5 1/4 cups all purpose flour, sifted
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons grated lemon rind

*(can be all shortening or a mixture of shortening and butter – I usually use 3/4 cups butter and 3/4 cups Crisco shortening)

Cream shortening. Add sugar gradually and cream together until light and fluffy. Stir in well-beaten eggs and beat until thick. Add lemon rind.

Sift together flour, baking powder and salt. See note below. Add dry ingredients to the shortening, sugar, egg and lemon mixture one cup at a time.

Divide into 3 or 4 parts, wrap in waxed paper or plastic wrap and chill thoroughly (several hours or overnight).

Now you’re ready to bake the cookies. Heat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

Roll out dough to 1/4 inch thick on a floured surface and cut out with cookie cutters. If you’re baking in a warm climate you will want to keep each piece of dough in the refrigerator until you’re ready to work with it. Otherwise I like to let it sit at room temperature for 5 or 10 minutes before I start rolling it out.

Place on ungreased baking sheets with a 1/2 inch margin between cookies to allow for any spreading. (If you don’t want them to spread, chill entire sheet before baking.)

Add colored sugars, sprinkles, and any other decorations before baking.

Bake until just barely brown around the edges, which is 8 to 15 minutes depending on your oven and baking sheet.

Let cool and then frost undecorated cookies, if desired. (These are good just plain, too.)

Note: Since I’ve started using a Kitchen-Aid mixer to make these cookies I don’t sift together the dry ingredients first. Instead, I mix in the salt and baking powder to the creamed mixture first, then add the flour. Also, depending on the weather and humidity, you may need slightly less flour. You want to end up with dough the consistency of Play-Dough. The sifting of dry ingredients is just to help distribute the salt and baking powder more evenly when you’re mixing by hand.
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Seventeen” Cookies

1 cup butter
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1/2 tsp vanilla
3 cups flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt

1/3 cup butter
1 tsp vanilla
3 cups sifted confectioner’s sugar
2 tbsp milk
pinch salt
food coloring

Preheat oven to 325. Cream butter and sugar. Blend in eggs and vanilla. Add sifted flour until just combined. Chill for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Roll out and cut into 3 inch rounds. Bake for 6 – 8 minutes.

Frosting: Cream butter, add vanilla and salt, Then add sugar alternating with milk beating until fluffy. Time the food coloring and icing fun!

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Chocolate Scotcheroos
Seventeen magazine 1960s Bake With a Boy (on a page with chocolate chip bars)

1 c. sugar

1 c. light corn syrup

1 c. creamy peanut butter

6 c. Rice Krispies or crispy rice cereal

1 c. (6oz.) semi-sweet chocolate chips

1 c. (6oz.) butterscotch chips

Combine sugar and light corn syrup in a large saucepan. Cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently, but only until mixture bubbles. Remove from heat. Stir in peanut butter and mix well. Add Rice Krispies and stir until well-coated. Press mixture evenly into a buttered 9×13 pan. Melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and butterscotch chips together over very low heat. Stir until well-blended. Remove from heat and spread over Rice Krispies mixture. Cool until firm. Cut into bars.

Here is another page:
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Sweet endings

10 Apr
sweet-mouthful1-e1522114941720.jpg

It feels weird that Vincent Price is the man my family credits for the sweetest, most angelic dessert we know.

His 1965 Joy of Creepy cookbook (Treasury of Great Recipes) is the source of our treasured family treat.
Boccone Dolce (“sweet mouthful”) is from Sardi’s on West 44th Street in Manhattan’s theater district.
It is ridiculous.

It’s an ice-box cake made with meringue, fresh strawberries, whipped cream and a touch of chocolate.

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UPDATE: We recently succumbed to a fit of the lazies and tried to make one large meringue (which we baked slowly for close to two hours)

But we should have left the chocolate sparse: we coated the whole thing and the cream couldn’t penetrate to soften the base. So while it looked good and tasted good, it was tough to cut and turned into a shipwreck.

289
293

BOCCONE DOLCE
(Sweet Mouthful)

Preheat oven to 250.
Meringue Layers: 3 base layers which can be done days ahead.
(some recipes call for 1/4 tsp cream of tartar and 250 oven)

4 egg whites, room temperature
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup superfine sugar

Preheat oven to 225 degrees. In mixer, beat egg whites, salt, cream of tartar, and vanilla extract until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in sugar and continue beating until meringue is stiff and glossy.

Line baking sheets with parchment. Trace three, eight inch circles on paper

With a rubber spatula, spread meringue evenly and equally over top of the circles. bake approximately 2 hours or until meringue becomes bisque colored. The low temperature will prevent them from browning too quickly. Then turn off oven, open oven door and let meringues “rest” in oven another 15 minutes. Remove from oven and carefully peel off parchment or waxed paper. Put cake on racks to dry until thoroughly cool.

Once cooled, meringues may be wrapped in saran and frozen or just store in an airtight container if using within the next 24 hours. NOTE: Wrap each meringue in several saran layers, then stack in a large plastic container for freezing. Remove from freezer at least an hour before assembling.

6 ounces of semisweet chocolate pieces
3 Tbsp. water
3 Tbsp. powdered sugar
3 cups heavy whipping cream
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
2 pints berries, sliced and macerated with sugar
Chocolate curls (for garnish) I just shaved some chocolate over the top
Melt chocolate pieces over hot water. When perfectly smooth, remove from heat and cool.

In a large bowl, whip the cream until stiff; gradually add powdered sugar and then vanilla extract. (try a splash of grand marnier)

Take two lbs./pints of fresh strawberries. Pick out the eight prettiest berries and put them back in the fridge for later. Hull and slice, or half, the rest of the berries into a bowl and sweeten with a half cup of sugar.

Stir gently, cover, and put back in fridge for an hour or two.

To assemble, place a meringue layer on a serving plate, rounded side down. Spread a very thin coating of chocolate over it. NOTE: Go easy on chocolate, too much will make it impossible to cut cake! I used a pastry brush to spread the chocolate.

Top chocolate with a layer (about 3/4 inch thick) of whipped cream.

Top cream with a layer of sliced berries.
Place a second layer of meringue on top of this, and repeat filling.
Top with final meringue, rounded side up (some say down), and frost top smoothly with remaining whipped cream.

Refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight. Garnish with several whole strawberries and chocolate curls.

This dessert is not the easiest to cut – use a serrated bread knife works well and use a sawing like motion.
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And to gild the lily, here’s a remarkable peach meringue cake sweetened with butter cream and bolstered by ground almonds.

ALMOND MERINGUE CAKE WITH PEACHES
From Laura Calder
4 ounces ground almonds or hazelnuts
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon sugar
4 egg whites
1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons125 g sugar (for the buttercream)
4 egg yolks (for the buttercream)
1 cup butter, very soft (for the buttercream)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (for the buttercream)
1 cup slivered almonds, toasted (for the topping)
6 peaches, sliced (for the topping)

Directions
Make the cake: Heat the oven to 275°F/140°C. Line two baking sheets with parchment and draw on two 9-inch/23 cm circles. (You could also do rectangles). Combine the ground almonds, cornstarch, and all but 2 tablespoons of the sugar. Beat the whites to peaks, then beat in the remaining sugar to make a stiff meringue. Fold in the almond mixture in three batches to combine thoroughly. Using a piping bag with a large tip, pipe the meringue onto the circles on the parchment. Bake until crisp and dry, about an hour and a half.
Make the buttercream: Heat the sugar with 1/3 cup + 2 tablespoons/100 ml water to dissolve, then boil to soft-ball stage, which is just before the syrup changes colour (239°F/115°C on a candy thermometer). Beat the egg yolks in a stand-up mixer, then, with the beaters running, quickly add the hot syrup in a thin stream. Continue beating until the mixture is cool and forms and thick mouse, about 5 minutes. Beat in the butter, gradually, and finally add the vanilla.
Assemble the cake: Set a round of meringue on a serving plate. Spread over a quarter of the buttercream. Lay in a layer of sliced peaches. Spread the top layer with buttercream and set it on top on the first. Spread the remaining butter cream over the sides of the cake. Press the toasted almonds all around the sides. Arrange another layer of peach slices on top.

C is for cookie, part 2

28 Feb

The battle continues. Classic chocolate chip.

The secret to a better chocolate chip cookie? Letting the dough rest for 36 hours.

From the New York Times: “What he’s doing is brilliant. He’s allowing the dough and other ingredients to fully soak up the liquid — in this case, the eggs — in order to get a drier and firmer dough, which bakes to a better consistency.”

Time: 45 minutes (for 1 6-cookie batch), plus at least 24 hours’ chilling

JACQUES TORRES’ CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES
NYT

2 cups minus 2 tablespoons (8 1/2 ounces) cake flour

1 2/3 cups (8 1/2 ounces) bread flour

1 1/4 teaspoons baking soda

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt

2 1/2 sticks (1 1/4 cups) unsalted butter

1 1/4 cups (10 ounces) light brown sugar

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (8 ounces) granulated sugar

2 large eggs

2 teaspoons natural vanilla extract

1 1/4 pounds bittersweet chocolate disks or fèves, at least 60 percent cacao content (see note)

Sea salt.

 

Sift flours, baking soda, baking powder and salt into a bowl. Set aside.

Using a mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter and sugars together until very light, about 5 minutes.

Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Stir in the vanilla.
Reduce speed to low, add dry ingredients and mix until just combined, 5 to 10 seconds.
Drop chocolate pieces in and incorporate them without breaking them.
Press plastic wrap against dough and refrigerate for 24 to 36 hours.
Dough may be used in batches, and can be refrigerated for up to 72 hours.
When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick baking mat. Set aside.
Scoop 6 3 1/2-ounce mounds of dough (the size of generous golf balls) onto baking sheet, making sure to turn horizontally any chocolate pieces that are poking up; it will make for a more attractive cookie.
Sprinkle lightly with sea salt and bake until golden brown but still soft, 18 to 20 minutes.
Transfer sheet to a wire rack for 10 minutes, then slip cookies onto another rack to cool a bit more.
Repeat with remaining dough, or reserve dough, refrigerated, for baking remaining batches the next day.
Eat warm, with a big napkin.
Yield: 1 1/2 dozen 5-inch cookies.

Note: Disks are sold at Jacques Torres Chocolate; Valrhona fèves, oval-shaped chocolate pieces, are at Whole Foods.

 

Half a Pound of Dark Chocolate Chunk Cookies
Dinner With Julie

3/4 cup butter, at room temp

1 cup packed brown sugar

1/4 cup sugar

1 large egg

2 tsp vanilla

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 tsp. cornstarch

1 tsp. baking soda

1/2 tsp. salt

8 oz. dark or semi-sweet chocolate, chopped into chunks

Preheat oven to 350F. In a large bowl, beat the butter and sugars until pale and almost fluffy.

Beat in the egg and vanilla.

Add the flour, cornstarch, baking soda and salt and stir or beat on low until almost combined; add the chocolate chunks and stir just until blended.

Drop dough by the spoonful onto a parchment-lined (or buttered) sheet and bake for 10-14 minutes (depending on their size) until golden around the edges but still so in the middle. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

C is for cookie

28 Feb

This is the battle to end all battles, in two parts.

Part one: chocolate vs. chocolate. Dorie Greenspan’s world peace cookies vs. Vancouver’s Thomas Haas’s chocolate sparkle cookies.

Two adorable names (world peace? sparkles? goodie!), two scrumptious recipes.

CHOCOLATE SPARKLE COOKIES

recipe ran in the Vancouver Sun, which we couldn’t locate, but did find here, with great pictures.

1/2 lb bittersweet chocolate (Haas recommends Valrohna if possible)
3 tbsp butter, room temperature
2 eggs
1 tbsp honey (Haas recommends Blackberry)
1/3 cup sugar, plus more for rolling
3/4 cup ground almonds
2 tsp cocoa powder

pinch of salt

Melt chocolate on top of a double boiler, over (but not in contact with) simmering water. Remove from heat. Cut butter into small pieces and mix into the heated chocolate until melted.

Beat eggs, gradually adding the sugar and honey until light and the mixture falls into thick, smooth ribbons (about 10 min). Fold into the chocolate mixture. Add the cocoa powder and salt to the ground almonds and mix; gently add to the chocolate mixture. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Use an ice cream scoop to form the dough into 1 inch balls. Working quickly, roll the balls into granulated sugar. Place on the Baking sheet 2″ apart. Bake at 325 for 12 minutes, until the centres are moist, but not wet. Cool slightly. Dust lightly with powdered icing sugar. Makes about 36 cookies.

Note: You may find this recipe has cocoa and honey added that were not included in the original recipe. Thomas Haas tweaked the recipe between the LA Times version and Vancouver Sun printed version.

WORLD PEACE COOKIES

Go here to see good photos.

Makes about 36 cookies

1 1/4 cups (175 grams) all-purpose flour
1/3 cup (30 grams) unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 stick plus 3 tablespoons (11 tablespoons or 150 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2/3 cup (120 grams) (packed) light brown sugar
1/4 cup (50 grams) sugar
1/2 teaspoon fleur de sel or 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
5 ounces (150 grams) bittersweet chocolate, chopped into chips, or a generous 3/4 cup store-bought mini chocolate chips

Sift the flour, cocoa and baking soda together.

Working with a stand mixer, preferably fitted with a paddle attachment, or with a hand mixer in a large bowl, beat the butter on medium speed until soft and creamy. Add both sugars, the salt and vanilla extract and beat for 2 minutes more.

Turn off the mixer. Pour in the flour, drape a kitchen towel over the stand mixer to protect yourself and your kitchen from flying flour and pulse the mixer at low speed about 5 times, a second or two each time. Take a peek — if there is still a lot of flour on the surface of the dough, pulse a couple of times more; if not, remove the towel. Continuing at low speed, mix for about 30 seconds more, just until the flour disappears into the dough — for the best texture, work the dough as little as possible once the flour is added, and don’t be concerned if the dough looks a little crumbly. Toss in the chocolate pieces and mix only to incorporate.

Turn the dough out onto a work surface, gather it together and divide it in half. Working with one half at a time, shape the dough into logs that are 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Wrap the logs in plastic wrap and refrigerate them for at least 3 hours. (The dough can be refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 2 months. If you’ve frozen the dough, you needn’t defrost it before baking — just slice the logs into cookies and bake the cookies 1 minute longer.)

Getting ready to bake: Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 325°F (160°C). Line two baking sheets with parchment or silicone mats.

Working with a sharp thin knife, slice the logs into rounds that are 1/2 inch thick. (The rounds are likely to crack as you’re cutting them — don’t be concerned, just squeeze the bits back onto each cookie.) Arrange the rounds on the baking sheets, leaving about one inch between them.

Bake the cookies one sheet at a time for 12 minutes — they won’t look done, nor will they be firm, but that’s just the way they should be. Transfer the baking sheet to a cooling rack and let the cookies rest until they are only just warm, at which point you can serve them or let them reach room temperature.

Serving: The cookies can be eaten when they are warm or at room temperature — I prefer them at room temperature, when the textural difference between the crumbly cookie and the chocolate bits is greatest — and are best suited to cold milk or hot coffee.

Do ahead: Packed airtight, cookies will keep at room temperature for up to 3 days (Deb note: not a chance); they can be frozen for up to 2 months. They can also be frozen in log form for months, and can be sliced and baked directly from the freezer, adding a coupld minutes to the baking time.

Cool Yule

24 Dec

Growing up, we were a fruit cake and goodie family at Christmastime, so we’re a little late getting to la bûche de Noël. Oh, but it’s never too late to start new traditions. The city’s elegant French and Belgian patisseries are offering gorgeous versions of the traditional sponge and mousse cake. Pricy, to be sure, but deadly good.

We had already ordered weeks in advance and forked over our credit card when brilliant and lovely Dinner with Julie proposed the idea of transforming an old fashioned wafer roll into a quick yule log. We nearly died of happiness. So simple! So fast! So next year!

Mousse insides can span all sorts of flavours: spiked with Baileys Irish Cream (!), espresso, hazelnut, gingerbread spice, peppermint, or any combination of fruit (raspberry, apricot, passionfruit, etc.).

UPDATE: We did it!

Raspberry on the inside, Bailey’s and marscapone with whipping cream on the outside. Our raspberry cream was a little too loose (too much water from the frozen berries we pushed through a seive.
But that’s easy to fix next time. Also, we ran out of time to sprinkle cinnamon or cocoa on the finished log, which has a ghostly naked appearance:

We like the idea of a raspberry filling and frosting made with 1 cup whipping cream, 1/2 tbsp brown sugar, and then folding in 1/2 cup Irish Cream mixed with 1/2 cup of mascarpone.

Chocolate wafer cookies, graham wafers and god knows whatever other biscuits will work.