Tag Archives: Calgary Red Eye

Here’s red in yer eye

5 Jul

Who doesn’t love a Calgary Red Eye? Here are two ways to include beer and Clamato into your Stampede party menu.

BLOODY CAESAR STEAMED MUSSELS
recipe from Cooking With Booze(We’d like to see this with beer added to the Clamato juice to make up one cup of liquid.)

500g (1 lb.) mussels, beards removed
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
250ml (1 cup) Clamato juice
50ml (1/4 cup) vodka
2 plum tomatoes, chopped
2 tablespoons chopped celery leaves
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons horseradish
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
dash Tabasco sauce
freshly ground black pepper

In a colander, shake and rinse mussels under cold water, discarding any that remain open. Heat oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and cook for 2 to 3 minutes until softened. Add the remaining ingredients along with mussels. Cover and steam over high heat until mussels open (4 to 5 minutes). Transfer to a bowl and serve with warm crusty bread or spoon over cooked linguine for a complete meal
_______________________________
Again, we’d like to see beer in this. Considering how well pork goes with clams, perhaps a switch up with clamato juice and pork?

STAMPEDE RED EYE STEW

4 russet potatoes, peeled and diced into 1-inch cubes
1/2 cup unsalted butter
2 pounds buffalo stew meat (preferably sirloin)
1/2 yellow onion, chopped
1/4 tablespoon ground white pepper
1/4 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
1/4 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
1/2 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
1/2 tablespoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes
1/2 cup bourbon
1/2 cup strong coffee
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 cups water
Directions
In a medium saucepot on medium-high heat, add the diced potatoes and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Once it has reached a boil, reduce to medium heat and continue to simmer. Cook until the potatoes are halfway done, drain, and reserve.

While the potatoes are simmering, in a large saucepot over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the stew meat, onions, herbs and spices. Once the meat begins to brown, sift in the flour to coat the meat and mix well. Cook the flour with the meat for 5 minutes.

Add the canned tomatoes to the meat mixture and let simmer for 5 minutes. Then add to the buffalo mixture, the half-cooked potatoes, bourbon, coffee, Worcestershire and water and bring to a boil. Once a full boil has been reached, reduce heat to simmer. Simmer for 30 minutes, or until the buffalo meat is tender.

Ay Ay, Red Eye

3 Jul

IMG00302The Caesar may have been created here 30 years ago by Westin Hotel bar manager Walter Chell, but you can bet we’ll be enjoying a few Red Eyes while watching the chucks.

Just add clamato juice to beer (up to half and half, but we prefer a 1:4 ratio) and there you have a Calgary Red Eye.

This year, after reading the New York Times piece about the comeback of the beer cocktail, we took the Red Eye to a new level. We enhanced our beer with a Caesar: half beer, half vodka-spiked Clamato. Beesar? Be careful, they pack a wallop.

Another Stampede libation making the rounds in backyards everywhere is the Beergarita. Somewhat vile sounding, it’s undeniably refreshing on a scorching day. A good welcome wagon drink, also.

In Chicago, the beergarita — a margarita amplified by Flemish sour ale and framboise — is popular at Small Bar.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/01/dining/01cocktail.html?ref=dining

Beergarita is a cousin to our favourite Victoria Day long weekend staple, Skip and Go Naked (pink lemonade, gin, and beer).

Beergarita
1 (12 ounce) can frozen limeade concentrate
6 ounces tequila (half the limeade can)
3 (12 ounce) cans lager beer
Lots of ice

Combine all ingredients in a large pitcher. If you’re ambitious, you could put the whole works into a blender for frozen margaritas. But. Honestly. It’s Stampede and we don’t have a minute to spare. Old school ice cubes work wonders, especially for watering down too-sweet limeade.

And don’t feel guilty about using pedestrian canned limeade for this rather than concocting juice with fresh (key!) limes. Save your money for the casino and get off your high horse.