Seventeen Nacho Casserole

18 Jul

Here’s a bit of nostalgia, courtesy of lovely Linda O. This looks soooo much better than my ghetto photocopy from days gone by. Many thanks!

Hop into this Tex-Mex time machine from November 1982:

Nacho Casserole

Says Linda: “I made the Nacho Casserole a bunch of times many years ago, and then just a few months ago I whipped it up for a dinner and it was as enjoyable as ever!”

The same issue also had a recipe for shortbread, not shown.

The ’80s was Tex-Mex crazy, and this page is a hilarious reminder. There was also a fajita recipe page: Zest of the West. If anyone has it, please share!Nacho Casserole recipe 2

Jean’s Beans: Stampede style

12 Jul

An old recipe for Stampede time, from Jean Hoare – Driftwillow Ranch, Stavely, Alberta

SERVES 6 to 8

1-1/2 cups assorted dried beans
Water to cover beans
1 large onion
8 whole cloves
¼ cup ea molasses, brown sugar, maple syrup
½ cup ketchup or chili sauce
1 tbsp dry mustard
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
½ cup boiling bean water
diced salt pork, bacon ends or leftover baked ham

Beans may include one or more of the following: small white navy beans, the larger Great Northern beans, pinto, limas, kidney, blackeye, garbanzos or chick peas.

Put assorted beans into a large heavy pot and cover with water, about three or four times as much water as beans. Let stand overnight. Drain and cover with fresh water. Cover, bring to a boil, then simmer slowly until tender. Test for doneness of beans by blowing on them. If done, the skins will blow off. The small navy bean will take the longest to cook. Do not add meat or other ingredients yet or the beans will not soften. They should boil alone in water until tender.

When beans are tender, drain reserving the liquid. Stick whole cloves into the onion and add to the cooked beans. Add molasses, brown sugar, maple syrup, ketchup, dry mustard, salt, Worcestershire sauce and half the reserved liquid. Add meat. Cover and bake at 250○ F for 6 to 9 hours, adding extra bean water or more ketchup if the mixture becomes dry. Uncover for the last half hour and adjust seasonings, if necessary.

For camp, prepare the beans up to the final baking stage. Then dig a hole at least 4 inches deeper than the heavy iron bean pot. Prepare enough coals to have a good layer underneath the pot and on top of it. Put the bottom layer of hot coals into the hole, then lower the pot into the hole, covering the lid with foil to keep out any dirt. Cover with remaining coals and bury with at least 3 inches of dirt. Bake in the pit for at least 4 hours, watching that the dirt stays in place, thus holding in the heat.

A final word about beans. To speed up the soaking process, cover the dried beans with water, bring to a boil and simmer for 2 minutes. Then remove from heat and let stand, tightly covered, for 1 hour. Blanching beans like this is equivalent to about 8 hours soaking.

Seventeen Recipe Terror

23 Jun

For all the nostalgic, wholesome memories of old Seventeen magazine recipe pages we share, there are some real horrors.

seventeen 1970

Deli-go-round Ready to Whirl. Or is that hurl? Circa Seventeen August 1970

“Potato salad mold for teen girls to spin up with ‘madcap olives flaunting carrot and pepper fringe.'”

The 1980s brought you dorm room cookery under a Katrina and the Waves poster. What could go wrong?

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Sausage and peppers with garlic toast and a tomato mozzarella salad with banana s’more tarts for dessert? Served with a side of sweat socks.

The sandwich press only adds to the horror:

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Or the assistance of “mini machines” for all your instant, ulp, food supplies…

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Cinco de Taco

7 May


Vintage Vinaigrette

19 Apr

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Here’s a mid-century steakhouse classic: Tomatoes Vinaigrette circa 1958ish from our parents’ SAIT cooking classes.

Sweet and sour, fresh and tangy. This is old school satisfying and a breeze to put together.

Sure you can update the oil and the vinegar but there’s something authentic in its simplicity.

Makes us think of Peter Luger’s sliced beefsteak tomatoes with vidalia onions that are smothered in steak sauce (boil 1/4 cup red wine vinegar, 3 tbsp brown sugar, 1 tbsp Worchestershire, pepper. Take off heat and stir in 1 cup tomato sauce and 2 tbsp olive oil)

Tomatoes Vinaigrette
8 oz salad oil

8 oz vinegar

2 oz sugar by weight

salt and pepper to taste

1 fine diced onion

a bunch of chopped parsley

a bunch of green onions chopped

Slice tomatoes and lay in a circle around a wide plate (with a good rim to make sure the sauce does not run over). This can be done in advance and held in frig. The tomatoes should be cold. However, don’t pour the sauce over much before one hour before serving or it will go kind of mushy.

Mix vinaigrette ingredients, stir to dissolve sugar. Add the chopped onion. Just before pouring over tomatoes, add green onion and most of the parsley. Pour over the tomatoes. Cover tightly and refrigerate. Reserve some of the chopped parsley to sprinkle over the tomatoes at serving.

Next up: Killer loaded wedge salad

Lasagne Rolls

1 Apr

Seventeen Now You’re Cooking Lasagne Rolls circa 1982, courtesy of Sharon!

lasagne 1

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Viewable page here: lasagne roll recipe

side recipes here: Side recipes

Seventeen’s chicken cordon bleu

29 Mar

Hearty thanks to Linda and Sharon who shared these sought after pages. They are among the most requested vintage Seventeen mag Now You’re Cooking pages of yore.

Chicken Cordon Bleu_Seventeen magazine (1)

View recipe here:chicken 1

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View here: chicken 2

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