Seventeen magazine Fruitcake Bonbons

27 Feb

If you know us, you know we celebrate retro Seventeen magazine here: exclusively 1980s and exclusively recipes from Now You’re Cooking features.

So grasp hold of your Boy George fedoras and buckle up as we share something special from way back before those halycon days of neon, shoulder pads and all things Esprit and United Colors of Benetton…

Some of the top online requests for old Seventeen recipes that got us started sharing our preserved collection included a Valentine’s Day chicken parm, chicken cordon bleu, chocolate brownie ice cream cake among others. But the magazine’s recipes from decades earlier are still being talked about.

Behold the much requested fruitcake bonbons from December 1962. This lost recipe has been on our radar for a long time thanks to an online commenter: “I saw a recipe for tiny, bon-bon sized fruitcakes in Seventeen magazine. They struck me as unutterably sophisticated…” Special thanks to Kathy C., who took advantage of a quiet night to track this down for us: “I wrote in to your site a few years ago looking for the turkey Normandy recipe I made as a teen and someone found it for me!  I was so thrilled and it makes me happy to help other people experience that joy. I love the work you do on your site, reuniting people with some of the first recipes we made. It’s great to be part of this community.”

Do you have a recipe you are searching for? Or do you have 1980s recipes to share? Let us know in the comments!

And happy bonbon making:

Seventeen Stack a Snack

6 Jan

From August 1979

Skillet lasagna

1 Dec

Courtesy of America’s Test Kitchen.

Seventeen Jambalaya 1982

8 Sep

The best we could do for readers in search of jambalaya from Seventeen’s retro Now You’re Cooking was our 1987 version:

cookbookcherie

But now, dear readers, we can all thank Tammy R for sharing the 1982 pages you loved:

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Do you have a 1980s Seventeen recipe to request or share? Check out our inventory here.

Seventeen Tuna Creole

2 Sep

This might be from Seventeen’s September 1980 Now You’re Cooking.

An online recipe poster writes: “My younger sister discovered this recipe when she was a teenager reading teen magazines, such as Seventeen or Young Miss. I think she first made it served over a lemony buttered rice.”

The version of tuna creole calls for sauteing two yellow onions, sliced. When soft add a can of diced or crushed tomatoes, black pepper, garlic salt, and two bay leaves. Simmer for 15 minutes and taste to see if it needs a pinch of sugar. Add 1/4 cup manilla olives and a large can of tuna. Cover and simmer for another five minutes.

Do you have a 1980s Seventeen recipe to request or share? Check out our inventory here.

 

Seventeen’s Cheese Enchiladas!

23 Aug

We are happy to present to you Seventeen’s Now You’re Cooking March 1979:

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The long-lost page requested by Michelle W. and found by… yes, Michelle W.! Gotta say, it is truly amazing how these pages are popping up. Thanks to Michelle (and her great friend) who shared this page.

Do you have a recipe page to share or to request? Check out the list over here.

And let us know in the comments below if you give this vegetarian enchilada dish a try!

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Marinated Red Onions

14 Aug

Marinated Red Onions
No Crumbs Left

Thinly slice a red onion and place in a non-reactive bowl.

Pour over a blended mixture of 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, 1 tbsp red wine vinegar and 1 tbsp dried oregano.

Cover with plastic wrap and let sit on the counter to marinate for a minimum of three hours.

 

Desperately seeking Seventeen recipe:

13 Aug

Now filed under FOUND!

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UPDATE: Michelle W., is a rock star! Lo and behold, she has answered the call to track down and share the manicotti pages!

 

We have had some great recent success tracking down vintage 1980s Seventeen magazine Now You’re Cooking recipes! See requests and found recipe links here.

Cookbookcherie

 

Seventeen’s London Broil

11 Aug

A huge thank you to Jill for her kindness in sharing this London Broil recipe page from Seventeen. And thanks to her Mom who located this treasure for her!

Fun to compare a dark and fuzzy photocopy from another Seventeen London Broil recipe we captured from a library bound copy back in the day (at bottom).

More requests are here for anyone who can help!

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Not sure what year this other Seventeen London Broil recipe is from. I don’t know which is more horrifying: the thought bubbles (Him: I can tell she’s impressed with my first stab at chef-ing. I hope she likes her London broil rare. Her: This is a such a rare treat I don’t have the heart to tell him I like my meat well done) or the recipe’s call for canned potato sticks!

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Seventeen’s Chicken Piccata

7 Aug

Thanks Trena P for this Chicken Piccata recipe page from Seventeen’s Now You’re Cooking November 1979.

Do you have a page you’re searching for or one you’d like to share? Check requests here.

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CHICKEN PICCATA

4 boned and skinned chicken breast halves
2 Tbsp flour
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
salt and pepper, to taste
1 cube or 2 Tbs chicken bouillon
1/4 cup boiling water
2-4 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 Tbsp butter
4 lemon slices (optional)

Pound chicken breasts between 2 pieces of plastic wrap until thin. In large skillet, melt butter and oil over medium heat. Dip chicken in flour and add to pan, 2 at a time, and saute until golden. Season with salt and pepper and keep warm in oven.
Dissolve bouillon in boiling water and add to pan with lemon juice. Cook, stirring constantly, until pan is deglazed. Add butter and stir until melted
Return chicken to pan and turn to cover with the sauce. Serve with rice to soak up all the good sauce.